THIS INSOLUBLE LIFESTYLE
Welcome to my blog! Some of the photos I post are for adults and of an erotic nature, so if you're under 18 or are offended by my posts please exit my blog. Unless otherwise noted, these pictures are not my own. Please feel free to share your thoughts or ask any questions. Thanks for stopping by!
THIS INSOLUBLE LIFESTYLE
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infinite-paradox:

Photo by Paul Morrison
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odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
odditiesoflife:




Seeing History in Color
Colorization has become increasingly popular lately, and the creators behind this new breed of updated imagery use all the technological resources of the last 20 years to strive for more than just plausibility — their aim is for historical authenticity. Image specialist Jordan J. Lloyd has achieved a way to do so that pays homage to the photo and to history. 
Lloyd is a specialist at a digital image agency and his work there is something of a digital counterpart to what wax workers at Madame Tussaud’s do while making their human sculptures — he provides the nuance that creates an illusion of vitality. While anyone with a computer and the financial resources could potentially try their hand at colorization, however like most pursuits it takes someone devoted to the craft to master it, with coloring that looks natural and real:
Reality standing in front of contradiction, 1930s
Unemployed lumber worker, circa 1939
Hindenburg Disaster – May 6, 1937
Auto wreck in Washington D.C, 1921
Kissing the war goodbye, V-J Day August 14, 1945
Albert Einstein, Nassau Point, Long Island, NY, Summer 1939
"Old Gold," country store, 1939
British troops cheerfully board their train for the first stage of their trip to the front – England, September 20, 1939
Thich Quang Duc, 1963
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infinite-paradox:

P-51D Mustangs of the 4th Fighter Squadron in flight, 1944-45
source: United States National Archives via D. Sheley
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infinite-paradox:


An East German soldier helping a boy cross the newly formed ‘Berlin Wall,’ 1961.

From what is known, the photograph was taken the day the emerging Wall was put up in August 1961 and the boy was found on the opposite side of the wall from his family. Despite given orders by the East German government to let no one pass, the soldier helped the boy through the barbwire. Near the exact time this photo was taken, it was said that the soldier was seen by his superior officer who immediately detached the soldier from his unit.
Concerning the fate of the soldier, most descriptions that come with photograph say that “no one knows what became of him.”
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yanktonirishred:

You never will be this amazing…
(via Love The Nitrous)
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infinite-paradox:

Ferrari F12
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lensblr-network:

State Lunatic Asylum
First hospital built on Thomas S. Kirkbrides plan.
by Justin Earsing  (justinearsing.tumblr.com)